Missing operating system ubuntu usb mac


Disclaimer

I believe the instructions on this page will work for them, although you should pay attention to the caveats presented in the next section. The trouble is that Ubuntu doesn't support installing to a Mac in EFI mode, at least not as of version Some sources claim that this now works on some later versions, but I haven't tested this claim—indeed, I lack the hardware to do so!

Installing Mac OS X on Blank Hard Drive Using Internet Recovery

The bit Ubuntu installation discs lack EFI support. Ubuntu has also released bit disc images for Macs. Ironically, these boot only in BIOS mode! Therefore, to rid your computer of the dangerous hybrid MBR, you'll need to jump through some hoops.

Missing Operating System..

An alternative to all of this is to run Ubuntu in a virtual environment, such as VirtualBox. This can be a good solution in some cases, but it doesn't give Linux direct access to the hardware and you'll lose some speed. These include:.


  1. Step 1: Getting Prepared.
  2. How to Install and Dual Boot Linux and Mac OS!
  3. Step 1: Getting Prepared.
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Note: Enthusiasts have been working to get Windows to boot in EFI mode on Macs, with some progress and considerable pain. See this thread on MacRumors, for example. This goal appears to be more attainable with Windows 8 than with Windows 7, and success depends on your specific Mac model. It's possible that your preferred distribution already supports direct EFI installation, in which case the problem of installing to a Mac in EFI mode may not exist.

Check your distribution's documentation to be sure. I've tested this procedure only on my first-generation Intel-based Mac Mini. It's possible that the bit version has different requirements, or you may need to do things differently on newer bit Macs. Note: For some reason, although I was able to install Ubuntu If you have this problem, you'll have to install rEFInd before you can install Ubuntu. With these items in hand, you can proceed with installing Ubuntu, and then fix it up so that it doesn't use a hybrid MBR. If you've already got a working dual-boot configuration with OS X and Ubuntu, you can skip this section and jump ahead to "Fixing the Installation.

When the installation finishes, the computer will reboot—straight into Mac OS X! See the below note if it doesn't boot, though. You must now proceed with fixing it up in various ways Note: If by chance your computer won't boot, try booting the Ubuntu installer but click Try Ubuntu to run it in its live CD mode. With any luck, OS X will start up again, and you can proceed with step 8. If you've followed the directions, your computer should now be booted into OS X, looking very much like it did before. Ubuntu is installed, however, and your disk has a hybrid MBR.

You must now take steps to return the hybrid MBR to a safer protective MBR, as the GPT standard requires, and to set up a boot loader that enables you to select which OS to boot when the computer powers up. To do so, follow these steps:. Note: The rEFInd installation instructions presented here are simplified. For the full instructions, including some variants, see the rEFInd installation page.

Update: If you're using a 3. At this point, it should be possible to boot Linux by rebooting the computer and selecting one of the vmlinuz- version entries in rEFInd's menu. If this doesn't work, continue with the main procedure described here At this point, if you did everything exactly correctly, you should be able to boot Ubuntu in EFI mode.

Notes about speed

When you reboot, your rEFInd menu should include a new Ubuntu option, as shown below. Select it and your GRUB menu should appear; it will resemble the one shown earlier, although it may use a different font and color scheme. It's no longer needed, but OS X may want free space where it resides in the future. You can use GParted, parted , gdisk , or any other partitioning tool to delete this partition. Although my own system doesn't seem to suffer from its presence, it's conceivable that some Macs will experience boot-time slowdowns because of the presence of the BIOS version of GRUB's boot code in the hard disk's MBR.

Be very careful with that command, though! If you write too much data in this way, you can damage your partition table! If you've not used it before, you may want to peruse the rEFInd documentation. Although the default options work well for most systems, you may want to tweak some of them or install ancillary programs, such as an EFI shell program. If you've already got a working dual-boot configuration with OS X and Ubuntu, you can skip this section and jump ahead to "Fixing the Installation.

When the installation finishes, the computer will reboot—straight into Mac OS X! See the below note if it doesn't boot, though. You must now proceed with fixing it up in various ways Note: If by chance your computer won't boot, try booting the Ubuntu installer but click Try Ubuntu to run it in its live CD mode. With any luck, OS X will start up again, and you can proceed with step 8. If you've followed the directions, your computer should now be booted into OS X, looking very much like it did before. Ubuntu is installed, however, and your disk has a hybrid MBR.

You must now take steps to return the hybrid MBR to a safer protective MBR, as the GPT standard requires, and to set up a boot loader that enables you to select which OS to boot when the computer powers up. To do so, follow these steps:.

Note: The rEFInd installation instructions presented here are simplified. For the full instructions, including some variants, see the rEFInd installation page.

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Installation/FromUSBStick - Community Help Wiki

This makes them very slow when running persistent live systems and 'installed systems' installed in the normal way, but to a USB drive. Also the lifetime number of write operations on a memory cell is much higher with the high quality hardware in USB 3 flash drives. But still, you should use noatime in fstab and use swap only for extreme situations to avoid excessive wear.

A LED light emitting diode helps you avoid unplugging the USB flash drive too early while it is saving data from the buffers in RAM , and decreases the risk of corrupting the file system. Flash drive tests are described by C. Cameron in this link, post 5. See also the following links Link to USB 3. In the beginning of , it seems that there are no really fast pendrives below 16 GB. But unless you already have a 1 GB drive, you are recommended to get one with at least 2 GB, hence the general recommendation above.

Ubuntu installation on USB stick with pure EFI boot (Mac compatible)

If you want a persistent live system with a decent size casper-rw storage, you need at least 4 GB 2 GB is possible, but might soon run out of space. If you want an installed system you need at least 8 GB 4 GB is possible with Lubuntu, but might soon run out of space.


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  • If you want a fast system, install it into a pendrive that performs well in a test, even if it is 'bigger than necessary'. Notes about bootability Most but not all USB pendrives are reliable for booting, even many of the slower ones, and they are much cheaper, and should be OK particularly for regular read-only live drives without persistence. Some computer hardware and some operating systems have issues with certain ports. And some USB pendrives just have issues also. Some of them cannot be used for booting.

    They are made to be mass storage devices, and have not exactly the same electronics and firmware. Some USB pendrives and computers 'do not like each other'. The pendrive might boot another computer, and the computer might boot from another pendrive everything else being the same. This is a link to test by Pendrivelinux including bootablility of USB flash drives.

    This test was made a few years ago.

    Some Caveats

    The cheap and slow Sandisk Cruzer Blade, 4GB, can be added to the list of reliable pendrives for booting. I have used it extensively for years and it has failed only once chainloading from Plop in a very old computer. This link shows a bootability test in January Some pendrives that did not work are shown in this link. This user is not the only one who likes 32GB Sandisk. The flash hardware This link to a post by DuckHook in the Ubuntu Forums describes how a flash drive works, and how it can fail, first getting read-only, then totally 'bricked'.

    Look for the tips and warnings! Postrequisites - restore the USB stick 'Postrequisites' - after installation: how to restore the USB stick to a standard storage drive.

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